Elizabeth Skowron

Elizabeth Skowron profile picture

Projects

Teddy Bear covers eyes
PCIT for child welfare-involved families: Coaching positive, responsive parenting to support children’s emotion regulation and self-control
Girls Sit in the back of a car together
Relationship between parenting quality, parent attributions, and child chronic inflammation
MRI
Impact of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) on brain organization of high-risk, maltreatment-exposed children.

Publications

Rodríguez-González M.
,
Schweer-Collins M.
, ,
Jódar R.
,
Cagigal V.
,
Major S.O.
(2019)
. Stressful life events and physical and psychological health: Mediating effects of differentiation of self in a Spanish sample. J Marital Fam Ther, 45(4):578-591. 10.1111/jmft.12358

,
Norman Wells J.
, ,
Mintz B.
,
Giuliano R.J.
, (2019)
. Recollections of positive early caregiving relate to sympathetic nervous system activation and chronic inflammation in subsequent generations. Dev Psychobiol, 61(2):261-274. 10.1002/dev.21815

Martin C.G.
, , , (2019). The Role of Caregiver Psychopathology in the Treatment of Childhood Trauma with Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Systematic Review. Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev, 22(3):273-289. 10.1007/s10567-019-00290-4

Norman Wells J.
, , ,
DeGarmo D.S.
(2019)
. Differential physiological sensitivity to child compliance behaviors in abusing, neglectful, and non-maltreating mothers. Dev Psychopathol. 10.1017/S0954579419000270

Lunkenheimer E.
,
Busuito A.
,
Brown K.M.
,
Panlilio C.
, (2019)
. The Interpersonal Neurobiology of Child Maltreatment: Parasympathetic Substrates of Interactive Repair in Maltreating and Nonmaltreating Mother–Child Dyads. Child Maltreat, 24(4):353-363. 10.1177/1077559518824058

Giuliano R.J.
,
Karns C.M.
,
Roos L.E.
,
Bell T.A.
,
Petersen S.
, ,
Neville H.J.
,
Pakulak E.
(2018)
. Effects of early adversity on neural mechanisms of distractor suppression are mediated by sympathetic nervous system activity in preschool-aged children. Dev Psychol, 54(9): 1674. 10.1037/dev0000499

Lunkenheimer E.
,
Busuito A.
,
Brown K.M.
, (2018)
. Mother-Child Coregulation of Parasympathetic Processes Differs by Child Maltreatment Severity and Subtype. Child Maltreat, 23(3):211-220. 10.1177/1077559517751672

Giuliano R.J.
,
Karns C.M.
,
Bell T.A.
,
Petersen S.
, ,
Neville H.J.
,
Pakulak E.
(2018)
. Parasympathetic and sympathetic activity are associated with individual differences in neural indices of selective attention in adults. Psychophysiology, 55(8):e13079. 10.1111/psyp.13079

Lampis J.
,
Cataudella S.
,
Agus M.
,
Busonera A.
, (2018)
. Differentiation of Self and Dyadic Adjustment in Couple Relationships: A Dyadic Analysis Using the Actor‐Partner Interdependence Model. Fam Process, 58(3):698-715. 10.1111/famp.12370

Giuliano R.J.
,
Roos L.E.
,
Farrar J.D.
, (2018)
. Cumulative risk exposure moderates the association between parasympathetic reactivity and inhibitory control in preschool‐age children. Dev Psychobiol, 60(3):324-332. 10.1002/dev.21608

Kim M.H.
,
Shimomaeda L.
,
Giuliano R.J.
, (2017)
. Intergenerational associations in executive function between mothers and children in the context of risk. J Exp Child Psychol, 164:1-15. 10.1016/j.jecp.2017.07.002

Lunkenheimer E.
,
Ram N.
, ,
Yin P.
(2017)
. Harsh parenting, child behavior problems, and the dynamic coupling of parents' and children's positive behaviors. J Fam Psychol, 31(6):689-698. 10.1037/fam0000310

Giuliano R.J.
,
Gatzke-Kopp L.M.
,
Roos L.E.
, (2017)
. Resting sympathetic arousal moderates the association between parasympathetic reactivity and working memory performance in adults reporting high levels of life stress. Psychophysiology, 54(8):1195-1208. 10.1111/psyp.12872

, (2017). Social-learning parenting intervention research in the era of translational neuroscience. Curr Opin Psychol, 15:168-173. 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.02.017

Lampis J.
,
Busonera A.
,
Cataudella S.
,
Tommasi M.
, (2017)
. Psychometric Properties of an Italian Version of the Differentiation of Self Inventory-Revised (It-DSI-R). J Adult Dev, 24(2): 144–154. 10.1007/s10804-016-9253-6

Lampis J.
,
Cataudella S.
,
Busonera A.
, (2017)
. The Role of Differentiation of Self and Dyadic Adjustment in Predicting Codependency. Contemp Fam Ther, 39(1):62-72. 10.1007/s10591-017-9403-4

Lampis J.
,
Cataudella S.
,
Busonera A.
, (2017)
. Effetti della differenziazione del sé sul benessere psicologico. / The effects of differentiation of self on psychological well being. Giornale Italiano di Psicologia, 44(2): 475–482. 10.1421/87351

Biography

Dr. Skowron is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and is a research scientist in the Center for Translational Neuroscience. She studied family systems and the process of family therapy while obtaining her Ph.D. at SUNY Albany. After a pre-doctoral internship at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center, she completed a post-doctoral fellowship in child clinical psychology at the University of California, San Francisco's Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, including the Irving B. Harris-funded Child Trauma Project at San Francisco General Hospital (Dr. Alicia Lieberman; Director) evaluating attachment-based child-parent psychotherapy for mothers and preschool children from violent families. A former Fulbright Scholar (Ireland, 2009-2010), she is on the editorial boards of several journals and serves on a standing NIH scientific review panel. Her current research investigates the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in strengthening biological and behavioral markers of emotion regulation and self-control in parents and their children, for family violence prevention.

Education

Ph.D. 1995, SUNY Albany
Major: Counseling Psychology
 
M.S., 1991, SUNY Albany
Major: Rehabilitation Counseling
 
B.A., 1988, The Ohio State University
Major: Psychology

Research

Dr. Skowron's research focuses on clarifying the individual and joint contributions of neurobiology and environment to the development of self-regulation and school readiness in young children. Her research also focuses on understanding the neurobiology of positive, responsive parenting and mechanisms of action in effective family interventions. Her core interests lie in discovering the neurobiological bases of behavioral change in family interventions, and translating findings into behavioral interventions that support healthy child development and family preservation. In the Family Biobehavioral Health Lab, Dr. Skowron and her research team use neural, physiological, behavioral, and micro-analytic coding approaches to model data streams in individual and dyadic parent-child processes associated with healthy development, and intervention outcomes. Her lab is currently completing a clinical trial of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to investigate the behavioral, neural, and physiological mechanisms of action in PCIT that support positive changes in parenting, improve parent and child self-regulation and social perceptions, and reduce child abuse and neglect in child welfare-involved families. 

Dr. Skowron will not be accepting new doctoral students for Fall 2021.